Sunday, December 11, 2011

Adventure Comics #151 - April 1950

sg
Comics Weekend "The Biography of Black Jack!" by Walter Isaacson and John Daly.
It's Adventure Sunday!

I take it back--this is my favorite Superboy cover, bar none. I hope Kal took the bullet he caught and threw it back at the hunter at super-speed.

Anyway, for those of you who don't get enough Black Jack--and who can, really?--this story ought to satisfy you. Behold--The Biography of Black Jack!

sg
sg
sgsg
sg
sg
...and with that, so ends another adventure with Aquaman!


I posted all six pages of this story, because...sadly, I must report this is the last appearance of Black Jack! Yes, according to Mike's Amazing World of DC Comics, Aquaman's #1 foe (Quantity Not Quality Division) made no further appearances after this story. And if you choose to, you can kinda see this story as a send-off to the character: Aquaman spends the whole thing humiliating the guy, so bad that seemingly gives up a life of crime.

Now, for all we know Grant Morrison or Geoff Johns has worked him into a more recent story and neither MAWODCC or the CBDB have caught up yet. And with Aquaman having a new series, who can really say that Scourge of the Sea is gone forever?

That said, you have to really chalk one up for the Golden Age Aquaman here: he defeated his #1 foe with just a few punches, neutralizing him as a threat for the rest of his life. If only the Silver Age Aquaman could say the same about his arch-nemeses...

2 comments:

Anthony said...

No more Black Jack?! Aww... guess Aquaman's plan really *did* ruin Black Jack's career here!

Wonder why the writers stopped using ol' Black Jack, however? Especially since they didn't seem to give Aquaman any other recurring foes (IIRC) through the rest of the 50s.

Re: Superboy: Yes, a nice cover! This month's story: A school gossip starts a gossip show on his ham radio; Superboy shows him the error of his ways.

Anonymous said...

Viva Adventure Sunday!

A book of great pirates that excludes Black Jack? Must have something to do with his track record. Well, farewell Black Jack. You were perhaps the worst sea-faring criminal I've ever come across, but I'll miss you.

I guess a brave new era starts next Sunday.

James Chatterton